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CardShark Content - Darik Dvorshak (2/10/2005)

(editor's note: The basics behind this guide are universal for trading of any sort, not just MTGO)

Most, if not everyone who drafts online has extra cards. Those extra cards are just sitting in your online binder waiting gathering electronic dust. Just like in the ´´real world´´ you can trade those cards for ones you want, ones you can trade later or perhaps even for online tickets.


First you have to get into a trade. There are a number of ways to find a trading partner. When playing in the casual room you can ask your opponent if they are interested in casually trading. You can go to the trading portion of the game and post a message in the message board. Or you can type /join casual from any window that will get you into a public room that has casual traders as well as sharks waiting to get you to part with your high dollar cards for peanuts. So, with that in mind, you need to follow some type of game plan to keep from getting ripped off.


So here are a few rules to follow. I'll expand on each later:


1. Know the approximate value of your cards and the ones you are interested in.

2. Keep the trades simple at least until you feel confident and 'know´´ the cards.

3. Don't be afraid to just back out of the trade.

4. Look closely at the cards you are trading for and giving up before pushing the final button.

5. Be careful of sharks.



Okay let’s go into these rules in a bit more detail. 1. Know the approximate value of your cards and the ones you are interested in. In real life trading you have price guides such as the Scrye magazine that you can use. I've found a few resources that help you determine values. While in the message trading board you can type a word such as witness and it will scroll to each buyer and seller of usually Eternal Witness
Eternal Witness
Eternal WitnessSet: Fifth Dawn
Cost:
3
Color:
Green
Type:
Creature
Sub Type:
Human Shaman
Rarity:
U
Number:
86
Power:
2
Toughness:
1
Text:
Whenever Eternal Witness comes into play, return target card from your graveayrd to your hand.
. Recently the card has been selling for 7 tickets and people have been buying it for 6. So you get an approximate value of 6.5. This is okay for the hot selling cards like Arcbound Ravager
Arcbound Ravager
Arcbound RavagerSet: Darksteel
Cost:
2
Color:
Colorless
Type:
Artifact Creature
Rarity:
R
Number:
100
Artist:
Carl Critchlow
Power:
0
Toughness:
0
Text:
Sacrifice an artifact: Put a +1/+1 counter on Arcbound Ravager. Modular 1 (This comes into play with a +1/+1 counter on it. When it's put into a graveyard, you may put its +1/+1 counters on target artifact creature.)
, Eternal Witness
Eternal Witness
Eternal WitnessSet: Fifth Dawn
Cost:
3
Color:
Green
Type:
Creature
Sub Type:
Human Shaman
Rarity:
U
Number:
86
Power:
2
Toughness:
1
Text:
Whenever Eternal Witness comes into play, return target card from your graveayrd to your hand.
, and Cranial Extraction
Cranial Extraction
Cranial ExtractionSet: Champions of Kamigawa
Cost:
4
Color:
Black
Type:
Sorcery
Sub Type:
Arcane
Rarity:
R
Number:
105
Artist:
Dave Allsop
Text:
Name a nonland card. Search target player's graveyard, hand, and library for all cards with that name and remove them from the game. Then that player shuffles his or her library.
, but doesn't really help with 2nd and 3rd tier cards. There are price guides available. You can simply use Cardshark's prices to get an idea of what your cards are worth do a quick search of the card you are trading in Cardshark's window and there is a price that someone is selling the card for. Also, a website called magictraders.com they have online price guides for physical cards as well as online cards. The current listing has that same eternal witness for 6.30 based on 6 transactions with a high of 8.99 and low of 5.88. Roughly our same 6.5 ticket value. The list is a good resource and one that just adds to your tools to know the value of your cards.


Number 2. Keep the trades simple. I've seen sharks pile a number of cards on a trade to overwhelm a trader. Some of the trades for 5, 10 or 20 cards get quite complicated in values and unless you are doing continuous trades during a day its just not worth it to trade for more than 1 or 2 cards at a time.


Number 3. Don't be afraid to just back out of the trade. That's always your option. You just say sorry I can’t do the trade and close the window.


Number 4. Look carefully at the cards you are trading before pushing the button. Wizards has made it easy. They give you a big screen to look at each card you are trading away and for. Look at it. Better than just look at it you can push ctrl+print screen and then past a copy of that picture into a word document so you have a permanent picture of the trade you just did.


And finally, number 5, look out for sharks. There are people who want to get your cards from you and give you nothing or next to nothing in return. The other night a message kept flashing Champions tournament deck 10 tickets buy quick. I finally opened a trade with the user and he quickly grabbed my 10 tickets and thought I would take his preconstructed deck. Just be careful out there. You know if you don't want to trade the cards Cardshark is a great way to turn those unwanted cards into cash.


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